Posts Tagged
‘Indian Sanitation’

HomeIndian Sanitation

In India, millions of people do not have access to toilets. Lack of sanitation infrastructure in rural areas has forced a large population to follow open defecation practices. This, in turn, has opened up the possibilities of health hazards, causing dangerous diseases such as diarrhoea, typhoid and dysentery, claiming hundreds and thousands of lives every year. Moreover, human waste in open grounds has led to soil and water contamination and environmental pollution, especially during the monsoon season.

India is one of the most populous countries in the world with high population densities in rural areas and urban cities. As a result, human waste treatment and management have become one of the major challenges faced by the country today. According to reports, less than 30% of the population in India have access to safe sanitation facilities. The majority of households in rural areas practice open defecation, which threatens to cause various diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera, hepatitis, dysentery etc.

Portable toilets have the potential to revolutionize the sanitation and hygiene standards in the construction industry. In India, workers typically spend 8 to 9 hours at construction sites, which are sometimes located at far off places or the outskirts of the city. There are other concerns like open defecation practice, which is still prevalent. It is also important to maintain cleanliness and promote hygiene among workers, as part of the Swachh Bharat initiative by the government of India.

A septic tank system is an excellent way to treat household waste. Buried under the ground and out of sight, many people expect septic tanks to function properly always. But in reality, septic systems can fail. Therefore, you must take extra care of your septic tank system. But before you learn more about septic system care, you need to know first how the septic system works.

In the past decades, sanitation in India has been one of the biggest challenges faced by the country. According to a report in 2015, only 40% population in India had access to safe sanitation. With a growing population in urban and rural areas, millions of people do not have access to proper sanitation facilities even today.

Algeria is the largest country in northern Africa. In this part of the world, water resources are estimated at 19.3 billion m3 /year, out of which 12.4 billion surface water and 6.9 billion groundwater are available. Most of the country’s surface is covered by the Sahara, and thus 90% of the population lives in the North. 

Water conservation is the crying need of the hour all over the world today. We’re entering into a future where cities globally are waking up to the prospect of dry taps. One way to prevent water wastage is to cut down on flushing of restroom urinals with our revolutionary technology.

Though we may have heard that manual scavenging is a thing of the past, the reality check is a shocker. In a small time span of just about a month, as many as 10 sanitation workers died. The only relief, though too late for the poor souls lost is that the government has responded with prompt action and focused on the implementation part of the law it had framed long ago.

The sanitation department in Delhi did something unprecedented- it punished its sanitation chief and six officials for not doing their job properly in containing dengue. Their salaries have been withheld and punitive action has been initiated. An online complaint system is being installed, which will have details of each Domestic Breeder Checker. To address gaps in the domestic breeding system, all heads of departments have been asked to submit selfies of homes visited. The seven punished officials were pulled up for ignoring their responsibilities regarding monitoring of mosquito- born infections and anti-mosquito drive. The online system will be now taking complaints from citizens, who can upload photos of mosquito breeding sites, and the officials will visit and inspect them.