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‘biological treatment’

Homebiological treatment

Rice is among the top three crops produced in Malaysia, and it is the staple food for the majority of the population. According to estimates, the adult population consumes 2.5 plates of white rice on average every day. In a year, the average consumption of a Malaysian resident is approximately 82.3 kg of rice.

The petrochemical industry is one of the fastest growing industries which contributes significantly to the growth of world economies. However, different refinery activities such as equipment cooling and desalting which involves water results in the generation of effluents. Also, an extensive amount of hazardous waste consisting of organic and inorganic compounds are left behind, which needs treatment. 

Seed treatment can be defined as the application of physical, chemical or biological agents to the seed before it is sown in the soil. This process is carried out in the form of dressing, coating and pelleting to fight against pathogens, insects and pests that harm seeds or plants. Biological seed treatment is the most preferred method across the world today as it helps in meeting environmental standards as well as socioeconomic requirements.

One of the major highlights of Organica’s septic tank cleaning products is that they are natural, eco-friendly, and effective. This completely negates the need for mechanical maintenance of septic tanks, saves time and money, and prevents groundwater contamination as well. 

Drug resistant disease strains are one of the biggest healthcare concerns globally today. Overuse of antibiotics is only one reason why diseases are becoming drug resistant though. An equally big role is played by inefficient wastewater treatment which results in antibiotic residues seeping into soil and water.

The Swachh Bharat story cannot become reality unless we ensure manual scavenging is actually eradicated. And this can only happen when we change individual practises and upgrade India’s sanitation infrastructure. And when we make sure we don’t treat lives of sanitation workers as disposable.

Untreated waste is not just a critical threat to public health, it is also a major threat to the environment. Toxic waste contaminates our air, soil and water, creating a cycle of harm breaking which will need all of us to make lifestyle changes at an individual level too.