Archive for the
‘Water’ Category

Water conservation is the crying need of the hour all over the world today. We’re entering into a future where cities globally are waking up to the prospect of dry taps. One way to prevent water wastage is to cut down on flushing of restroom urinals with our revolutionary technology.

The Swachh Bharat story cannot become reality unless we ensure manual scavenging is actually eradicated. And this can only happen when we change individual practises and upgrade India’s sanitation infrastructure. And when we make sure we don’t treat lives of sanitation workers as disposable.

Untreated waste is not just a critical threat to public health, it is also a major threat to the environment. Toxic waste contaminates our air, soil and water, creating a cycle of harm breaking which will need all of us to make lifestyle changes at an individual level too.

Cleaning septic tanks and sewerage systems in India is often accompanied by loss of life because we still ask humans to get into septic tanks and manholes to clean them. It doesn’t have to be this way. We have a natural solution that is much easier and better for the environment too.

Solid waste management is fast becoming an urban crisis in cities all across India. Managing this will require individuals to also support civic bodies and be conscious of the waste they generate. An ideal start would be waste segregation and for all housing societies to start composting organic waste.

Often, we become aware of some of the most important things in life only when they misbehave or stop working. Like our septic tanks. We don’t even think about them till something starts to smell rotten. It is better instead to learn about septic tanks so you can ensure they stay working well.

There isn’t enough conversation about septic tanks in our regular day-to-day lives. As a consequence, we don’t know enough about septic tanks. What do they do and how do they work and how do we maintain them? These are all questions everybody should know the answers too.

Poor sanitation, lack of access to clean water, and inadequate personal hygiene are responsible for an estimated 88% of childhood diarrhea in India. Taking action to improve health requires understanding the factors that influence exposure to faecal pathogens and the various pathways in which they are exposed to human beings.