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With a billion-plus population, water management is a far greater challenge in India compared to other countries in the world. According to a NITI Aayog report, 75% of households do not have access to clean drinking water, and 84% of households in rural areas lack safe piped water for use. Thus, water conservation measures are essential to ensure water is available in the future. One of the ways to achieve this objective is to use waterless urinals.

According to ENVIS Centre on Hygiene, Sanitation, Sewage Treatment Systems and Technology, a conventional urinal in India requires an average of 3-5 litres of water per flush. It means a large portion of water supplied to households, commercial establishments and industries is flushed down the toilet. Waterless urinals can help to save approximately 56,800 litres to 1,70,000 litres of water per urinal every year.

The French are believed to be the first to use septic tank systems in the 1870s, followed by the United States. Over a century later, septic tanks are still used worldwide at homes without access to sewage treatment plants.

A septic tank, made of concrete, plastic or fibreglass, is installed beneath the ground and performs the function of breaking down waste generated from the household. A malfunctioning system can cause a wide range of problems such as surface water pollution, disease outbreaks and environmental concerns. Therefore, your septic tank system needs regular maintenance and care to work at its best and break down organic waste efficiently.